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Walker Nolan ('65), center, between Sen. Howard Baker (R-Tenn) and Sen. Sam Ervin (D-NC) at the Watergate Committee hearings.

Alumni remember the 40th anniversary of Nixon’s resignation

Three alumni investigated the Watergate scandal that led to President Richard M. Nixon’s resignation.

Cassie Freund and a rhinoceros beetle in Borneo.

Saving the orangutans

Cassie Freund (’10) uses her biology degree to save wild orangutans in Borneo.

Kevin Shorter, wife, Allison, and their daughters explore pagodas in China.

Help, hope for orphaned Asian girls

His family’s vision, says Kevin Shorter (MBA ’06), is to keep orphaned Asian girls off the street and out of the sex trade.

Sue Fulkerson O'Connor (from left), Judy Palmer Newsoroff, Kay Overman Ferrell and Mary Martin Pickard Niepold

Didn’t skip a beat

Four Class of ’63 friends stage a Broadway reunion and answer their own question: What makes Wake Forest special?

Karen Beasley (left) with fellow cheerleaders Sue Ahrens Covington ('85) and Jim Hutcherson ('83, JD '89). (photo courtesy Beth Parker Stout)

Karen Beasley’s legacy: save the turtles

Her legacy of love for nature’s vulnerable sea turtles lives on at the Karen Beasley (’84) Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center.

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Motor mouth: Dentist on wheels

Dentist Sara Creighton (’05) hits the streets of San Francisco in a souped-up mobile dental office.

'Big Brother' Chad Brown (right) and Erik, his 'Little Brother.'

‘Big Brother’ takes his role seriously

Mentoring matters to Chad Brown (’01, JD ’06), who is North Carolina’s Big Brother of the Year for Big Brothers Big Sisters Services.

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Strong Is the New Pretty

Former soccer player Kate T. Parker (’98) is a mother and photographer whose new project shows young girls’ strength, power and confidence.

Katina Parker (right) with Dr. Maya Angelou

Filmmaker Katina Parker (’96) remembers Maya Angelou

A writer of world renown claimed Katina Parker (’96) and ‘watered and seeded’ her soul.

Reynolds Professor of American Studies Maya Angelou died on May 28, 2014.

Maya Angelou helped us find our voices

Maya Angelou had little patience for anyone who spoke in front of her class with a ‘small voice’ and challenged students to project with confidence, purpose and poise, writes John R. Hilley (’83).